Japan’s media industry is bracing for disruption

Japan’s media industry is bracing for disruption

As Japan’s well-entrenched traditional media industry is disrupted by changing consumer behaviour, companies with legacy ties are being left increasingly exposed, suggests Anthony Plant in this guest article.
On 7 September, 2013, the IOC announced Japan as the 2020 host of the 32nd Olympiad to the delight and jubilation of 126 million Japanese. The games come with a promise of accelerated growth and fervour, which has eluded Japan for a while owing to deflationary pressures.

Japan, the country which all innovators look to for its technological advancement, is poised to deliver and even exceed the expectations and take the world by storm. Attendees can be sure to meet with facial recognition technology, smartcards, language apps and dynamic maps to travel the city, and many more innovations which only Japan is capable of, including driverless cars.

The bold statement was made by the Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe at the annual meeting of the Science and Technology in Society (STS) Forum in October 2015, where he urged scientists and technologists to build “innovative ecosystems”. Calling on “magicians” to “captivate the world”, he quoted Arthur C. Clarke, well-known for the 2001 film: A Space Odyssey, stating: “Any advanced technology gets strikingly similar to magic.”

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